Heroin Bulletin 

Parents, Ex-Users Share Heroin Horror Stories

One mother cried out for help. Her daughter, a heroin addict, has been in and out of treatment several times. And it has taken an emotional toll on the mother, who has done everything she can for her only child. “It’s like you are spinning and spinning and spinning on a merry-go-round that won’t stop,” the mother said about the devastation. Emergency room nurses explained how they’ve seen multiple overdoses and it’s changed them. Another mother said her third-grade daughter had recently been offered a “piece of candy” at school….

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Still from the HBO Film Warning: This Drug May Kill You HBO Heroin Bulletin 

Painkillers to Heroin, New Film Shows It Can ‘Happen to Anybody”

The struggling heroin addicts whose tragic stories drive a harrowing new documentary about America’s opioid crisis turned to the needle after the damage was done by prescription painkillers. Only one of them is still alive when the credits close on “Warning: This Drug May Kill You,” a searing study of the plague directed by longtime New York newswoman Perri Peltz But in the final frames, the fate of a young survivor named Stephany Gay is anything but certain as she quits a program designed to wean her off the drugs…

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The Experts Are Stumped by Heroin Crisis Addiction 

Opioid Crisis is Stumping The Experts

Monday, April 24, 2017, 12:01 AM By Dave Mowery David Mowery: said it more than once while he was checking in from Atlanta. “Nobody really has a handle on this thing yet,” reporter Ford Turner said. Ford’s comment wasn’t because his eyes were suddenly opened to the growing opioid crisis. Rather, it was confirmation of what he has observed before he attended the National Prescription Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit last week. The summit drew a variety of professionals, law enforcement officials, heads of government agencies, congressmen and others to…

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Police scramble to find cause of rash of heroin overdoses Heroin Bulletin 

Police scramble to find cause of rash of heroin overdoses

A young woman was unresponsive and needed immediate medical attention in the blue-collar neighborhood mixed with apartments and homes. Soon after, another 911 call came from The Elms Apartments in Ogletown. Then Richardson Park near Elsmere. Finally, Pike Creek. In just over five hours, four people were dead in homes throughout New Castle County, and all indications point to heroin , said Officer First Class JP Piser, a spokesman with the county police department. Three women, ages 23, 26 and 59, were pronounced dead, along with a 63-year-old man, Piser…

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Heroin bust aftermath: A victim's mother grieves; prosecutors face 'challenge' Heroin Bulletin 

Heroin bust aftermath: A victim’s mother grieves; prosecutors face ‘challenge’

Bucks County prosecutors filed charges against 13 people Wednesday in what they said was a heroin trafficking ring. Tina Richartz has watched the video again and again. “Every day,” she said. “A hundred times a day.” And a hundred times a day she rewinds the recording and skips to the spot where the district attorney says her son’s name. On Wednesday, the Bucks County District Attorney’s Office announced it had busted a 13-member heroin ring run by Quakertown brothers. Among those arrested was the person who, police had determined, had…

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Ohio pilot, wife found dead in apparent fentanyl overdose, police say Fentanyl Awareness 

Ohio pilot, wife found dead in apparent fentanyl overdose, police say

Brian and Courtney Hayle were found dead on March 16, 2017 of apparent fentanyl overdoses. WHIO CENTERVILLE, Ohio — Family members say a woman found dead along with her airline pilot husband from apparent fentanyl overdoses had long batted drug problems. Police say the children of 36-year-old Brian Halye and 34-year-old Courtney Halye found their bodies at their home in Centerville near Dayton. They were discovered by their four children, who called 911, CBS affiliate WHIO reports . Brian Halye was a pilot for Spirit Airlines. In January of 2016,…

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US drug diplomat hails UN plans for control of fentanyl

The diplomat heading U.S. efforts to combat drug trafficking internationally is hailing a pending U.N. move to control substances used to make a deadly synthetic drug, but acknowledges it will not put an immediate dent in illegal trafficking. William Brownfield says the move to globally track the legal movement of fentanyl and substances used to make the drugs is an important step to reduce illegal use. But he told The Associated Press Tuesday that it is only one step in reducing dependency or addiction on the drug that may have…

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Heroin Bulletin 

Man Gets 8 Years For Selling Heroin To Teenage Girl Who Overdoses

Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow announces that a Dwight man was sentenced Friday to eight years in prison for selling heroin to a 19-year-old girl who died from an overdose in Wilmington in 2013. Joseph P. Alksnis, 26, pleaded guilty on Friday to one count of Drug Induced Homicide. He also pleaded guilty to one count of unlawful delivery of a controlled substance to an undercover police officer and received a 10-year sentence that will be served concurrently with the Drug Induced Homicide sentence. He was sentenced by Judge…

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Opioid Dependence Can Start in Just a Few Days Heroin Bulletin 

Opioid Dependence Can Start in Just a Few Days

THURSDAY, March 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) — Doctors who limit the supply of opioids they prescribe to three days or less may help patients avoid the dangers of dependence and addiction, a new study suggests. Among patients without cancer, a single day’s supply of a narcotic painkiller can result in 6 percent of patients being on an opioid a year later, the researchers said. The odds of long-term opioid use increased most sharply in the first days of therapy, particularly after five days of taking the drugs. The rate of…

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As opioid overdoses rise, police officers become counselors, doctors and social workers Heroin Bulletin 

As opioid overdoses rise, police officers become counselors, doctors and social workers

  Letter to the community on Holy Addiction Capt. Ron Meyers, left, and Deputy J. David Weber approach the apartment of an overdose victim from the previous week in Chillicothe, Ohio, on March 8. The Ross County Heroin Partnership Project collaborates with federal, state and local agencies in an effort to reduce heroin deaths. (Maddie McGarvey/For The Washington Post) The nation’s opioid epidemic is changing the way law enforcement does its job, with police officers acting as drug counselors and medical workers and shifting from law-and-order tactics to approaches more akin…

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